Wetherby Musical Theatre Group moves from it’s usual venue to the Linton Memorial Hall this spring for our latest production ‘Nunsense: The Mega-Musical Version

Below is an extract from the Linton Memorial Hall Website describing it’s heritage:

History of the Hall

Throughout the war the village of Linton spent a great deal of time organising fund raising events. In 1941 the villagers set themselves a target of £600 to fund the purchase of a heavy ambulance. £5,203 was actually raised – enough for a fighter plane in those days! During Wings for Victory Week in 1943 villagers began to feel that money should also be raised for the permanent benefit of the village. At a village meeting held in October 1943, The Linton Village Trust was established to create a happy and useful local environment. During the next two years various ideas were put forward for consideration by the Trustees. At a meeting in January 1946 it was decided to build a new Village Hall at the bottom of the hill on donated land. Government restrictions at the time, imposed because of a national shortage of timber and other building materials, meant that construction was delayed. The first official function in the Hall was a Coronation Party held on 2 June 1953.

The Hall contains an ingle-nook forming a Memorial for the seven young men from the village who had lost their lives. Poignantly, the carved Memorial was completed from a supply of oak, bought just before the war by one of the seven who died – Captain Graham Hayes, MC. Graham had been an apprentice woodcarver under Robert Thompson of Kilburn [The Mouseman]. Graham’s oak was carved by a craftsman in the wood-shop he had established shortly before his enlistment.